Bennis Welt

Pirat, Physiker, Free Software Nerd

My RawTherapee/Enfuse/Gimp workflow

with 5 comments

To show my readers my workflow I decided to blog about it. Today I will show you how this image was created:

IMG_8886

1. Basics
This tutorial assumes you are running a linux system with:

The raw file can be found here and is also CC-BY licensed: Download

2. RawTherapee

So lets open RawTherapee and load the raw file. I usually don’t change much there, it’s more a matter of personal choice. I use to sharpen and resize afterwards so we’ll only change brightness in RawTherapee for later use with enfuse.

With „Auto Levels“ set in the Exposure tab under Exposure we’ll get a brightness value of 1.22 which means I underexposed the image, but that’s no problem. Save this version of the image as IMG_8886a.jpg, change brightness to 1.5 save the result as IMG_8886b.jpg and do the same for brightness 2.0 and IMG_8886c.jpg. If you’ve done it correctly it should look like this:

This is all I do in RawTherapee for this image, now let’s move on to enfuse

3. Enfuse

Borrowed from the panotools wiki:

Enfuse is a command-line program used to merge different exposures of the same scene to produce an image that looks very much like a tonemapped image (without the halos) but requires no creation of an HDR image. Therefore it is much simpler to use and allows the creation of very large multiple exposure panoramas

I use it to get more details from darker parts, like in this case to brighten up the eyes naturally as I don’t like the look of HDR images.

Open a terminal and change to the directory where the three created images are in, now run following command:

enfuse -o out.jpg IMG_8886*.jpg

This should output in the terminal:

enfuse: Input image "IMG_8886a.jpg" does not have an alpha channel. Assuming all pixels should contribute to the final image.
enfuse: Input image "IMG_8886b.jpg" does not have an alpha channel. Assuming all pixels should contribute to the final image.
enfuse: Input image "IMG_8886c.jpg" does not have an alpha channel. Assuming all pixels should contribute to the final image.
Loading next image: IMG_8886a.jpg
Loading next image: IMG_8886b.jpg
Loading next image: IMG_8886c.jpg
Using 9 blending levels
Generating Gaussian pyramid: g0 g1 g2 g3 g4 g5 g6 g7 g8
Generating Laplacian pyramid: l0 l1 l2 l3 l4 l5 l6 l7 l8
Generating Gaussian pyramid: g0 g1 g2 g3 g4 g5 g6 g7 g8
Generating Gaussian pyramid: g0 g1 g2 g3 g4 g5 g6 g7 g8
Generating Laplacian pyramid: l0 l1 l2 l3 l4 l5 l6 l7 l8
Generating Gaussian pyramid: g0 g1 g2 g3 g4 g5 g6 g7 g8
Generating Gaussian pyramid: g0 g1 g2 g3 g4 g5 g6 g7 g8
Generating Laplacian pyramid: l0 l1 l2 l3 l4 l5 l6 l7 l8
Generating Gaussian pyramid: g0 g1 g2 g3 g4 g5 g6 g7 g8
Collapsing Laplacian pyramid: l8 l7 l6 l5 l4 l3 l2 l1 l0

You should have a „out.jpg“ in the folder where the three images are in which should like this:
out.jpg

Let’s open the image in gimp:

4. Gimp
To give the image the final touch I open the levels dialog via right click on the image → Colors → Levels:
levels

I change the input level’s left value to 25 and the input level’s right value to 240:
levels2

This yields:
IMG_8886.jpg

Now I crop the image using the rule of thirds guide and putting the upper right crossing right into her left eye:
crop.jpg

If you want to resize and sharpen use the unsharp mask, I usually don’t resize so we’re done here. The resulting image varies a bit from the flickr one, due to me creating this one all anew today and using different values in the levels tool probably:
IMG_8886.jpg

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Germany License

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Written by benniswelt

Juni 21, 2009 um 11:04

Veröffentlicht in Main

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5 Antworten

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  1. Thank you for posting this workflow! I was not aware of Enfuse and its capabilities…now i am thanks to your post! I will read up now on Enfuse as i am not very clear about what it can do from the use that you have demonstrated in your post.

    I came to your site from Heliconsoft website looking for the dcRAW executable🙂

    Best wishes!

    sendhil

    Juni 22, 2009 at 04:36

  2. Thank you for the comment, I added a description for enfuse in the tutorial.

    Benni

    benniswelt

    Juni 22, 2009 at 04:49

  3. First i’d like to thank you for that tutorial. It’s great that people like you share your knowledge. And I want to share a bit of mine. You can’t make HDRi from RAW file, because it’s physically impossible. RAW in this case is a HDR (I know that it doesn’t correspond to a definition of HDR). Let’s say your camera has 8EV. If you decode RAW with for for example linear gamma (= 1.0) you’ll get such tonal range. If you brighten or darken that image, you won’t get anymore information than that 8EV. I was able to reproduce this tutorial using img_8886a.jpg from this site (I hope you don’t mind) with only GIMP (and of course RawTherapee – which is a very good software btw, but for now I’m using Lightroom 3 Beta – it’s free till 30 June), by using this workflow:

    Colors – Curves:
    x:46 y:32
    x:156 y:175

    Filters – Enhance – Unsharp Mask:
    Radius: 2.0
    Amount: 0,20
    Threshold: 10

    Colors – Hue-Saturation
    Hue: -1
    Lightness: 0
    Saturation: 3

    Colors – Brightness-Contrast:
    Brightness: 0
    Contrast: 2

    Filters – Enhance – Sharpen:
    Sharpness: 25

    And you just have to crop it right.

    (The results are similiar people🙂 remember i was reproducing this workflow using different method)

    I wrote this not to offend you, but to show that creating HDR from 1 shot is just impossible (but creating HDR effect is). It’s even possible to make this tutorial using 8bit JPEG. Of course the histogram will be sliced as hell (we should use 16bit image to avoid it) but i can’t see as much difference.

    PS. I noticed that most people make HDR and go with so much contrast and clarity that it turns into regular image🙂 It’s just without any sense…
    PS2. Sorry if i made spelling or gramma mistakes. English is not my native language.

    Daniel

    März 26, 2010 at 00:11

  4. How do you set the grid in the crop tool in gimp?

    Nice tutorial!

    Mato

    August 17, 2010 at 17:00

  5. In the crop tool options, there’s a drop down menu, which should be labelled „no grid“ or something to this in your language. There’s „rule of thirds“, „middle lines“ and „golden ratio“

    benniswelt

    August 17, 2010 at 21:09


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